Positions

Mobility rule

Eligibility criteria

ESR (early stage researcher) shall at the time of recruitment by the host organization be in the first four years of their research careers.

  • Applicants may be on a PhD program but cannot be PhD holders at the day of signing their employment contract.
  • The position is open to applicants of all nationalities provided that the European Commission’s Mobility Rule is satisfied: “At the time of recruitment by the host organization, researchers must not have resided or carried out their main activity (work, studies, etc.) in the country of their host organization for more than 12 months in the 3 years immediately prior to the reference date. Short stays such as holidays and/or compulsory national service are not taken into account.”
  • Maximum and preferred period of employment: 36 months

Benefits

  • The project provides full funding for tuitions fees and salary.
  • The successful candidate will receive:
    • Living allowance (multiplied by the country correction factor which varies between 0.98 and 1.2): 3110 euros per month.
    • Mobility allowance: 600 euros per month.
    • Family allowance (if applicable): 500 euros per month.

 

For further information please go to: Marie Skłodowska-Curie Actions

#1

Monitoring icing and deicing on (micro)structured surfaces

Ice accretion causes malfunction and breakdown of wind power turbines, antennas and power lines. De-icing causes high environmental costs due to the consumed energy and chemicals. Still, icing and de-icing of surfaces is poorly understood. We lack microscopic information of the underlying processes close to the surface. We expect that space and time resolved information combined with the information on the stickiness of ice to the surface will foster our understanding of icing and deicing of surfaces, on cracks formation and propagation and on rupturing of surfaces.

The aim of this project is to study the efficiency of soft and hard micro-structured surface for anti-icing applications. The successful candidate will investigate where ice nucleates and how it grows? Does a structure fail during icing or de-icing? Where and how do cracks form and propagate? To gain the required space and time-resolved information, currently, we are setting up a homebuilt laser scanning confocal microscopy that is accompanied with an icing chamber. The candidate is expected to further develop the setup in team work, including the construction of an improved icing chamber that permits to work at temperatures down to -20 °C. Furthermore, the candidate will be in charge of combining the setup with a homebuilt device to measure the adhesion force.

The position requires:

  • Computer and mechanical engineering skills to further develop the setup
  • Background in physics or mechanical engineering for data analysis

For further information please contact:
Prof. Doris Vollmer, vollmerd@mpip-mainz.mpg.de

Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Mainz, Germany

 

Please submit your application until June 30, 2017 via the Euraxess web site:
EURAXESS offer ID: 177321

#2

Visualization and analysis of two-phase flow:

Textured substrates which are infiltrated by a lubricant form a new class of functional surfaces, called slippery surfaces. The texture is key for capillary forces to retain the lubricant in place. Slippery surfaces can repel almost all types of liquids. However, moving liquid drops (for example water) are surrounded by an annular wetting ridge, which can cause transport of lubricant (for example an oil) with the moving liquids. The same “problem” shows up if a water film is flowing over the lubricating fluid.

positions_4

positions_5The aim of this project is to understanding the interplay among the physical- and chemical interactions between the solid surface topography, the lubricating film and the liquid under static and flow conditions. To gain insight into the underlying mechanisms, the candidate will apply laser scanning confocal microscopy. This allows visualizing the sliding liquid, the lubricant, and the textured substrate with a spatial resolution of a few hundred nanometers at a line frequency of 8 kHz. The flow field can be visualized by adding tracer particles. The candidate will investigate microstructured surfaces impregnated by Newtonian liquids or swollen gels.

The position requires:

  • Knowledge on image processing and programming (Matlab, Mathematica, or Python)
  • Interest in hydrodynamics
  • Background in physics or mechanical engineering

For further information please contact:
Prof. Doris Vollmer, vollmerd@mpip-mainz.mpg.de

Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Mainz, Germany

 

Position closed

#3

Monitoring the motion of bacteria and cells under still and flow conditions

To minimize biofouling, understanding of the adhesion of proteins, bacteria and cells on lubricating surfaces is essential. Within the here announced PhD thesis, the motion of bacteria and cells will be monitored by laser scanning confocal microscopy in 3-dimensions. This information will be complemented by XPS, SEM and further surface sensitive techniques. In particular we aim to understand how adhesion depends on the type of lubricant and flow velocity. In close cooperation with chemists and material scientists, the candidate will design surfaces with different chemical affinity of the lubricant to the surface.


Position closed

#4

Particles and bacteria at slippery surfaces

Millions of tons of surfactant and aggressive chemicals are annually used to clean surfaces, bottles, storage-jars, or walls. Economic losses due to biofilm formation are estimated to be above 40 billion € per year in the shipping industry and account for 80% of microbial infections in the body. An important motivation behind developing slippery surfaces is for their anti-fouling properties: Deposited liquid or solid particles, bacteria or other microorganisms easily slide off as soon as the surface is tilted by a few degrees.

Typical swimming trajectories in a thin film for two different organism types.

The DPhil (= Oxford PhD) student will model the dynamics of particles and bacteria on the slippery surfaces and investigate the most efficient way to minimize friction and optimize contaminant removal. We shall ask what determines the adhesion of particles and microorganisms to gel- or lubricant impregnated surfaces? Does adhesion depend on the concentration of particulate matter, the viscosity of the lubricating film and its flow velocity? How do the swimming properties of the microorganisms affect adhesion? At Oxford we will concentrate on mesoscale modeling (lattice Boltzmann and stochastic rotation dynamics) and analytic approaches, with close interactions with molecular modelers and experimentalists in the LubISS network.

The position requires:

  • An interest in computational and theoretical physics.
  • Strong analytic ability, as evidenced by eg an excellent first degree in physics, mathematics or a related subject.
  • A willingness to contribute fully to the scientific interactions of the network.

For further information please contact:
Prof. Julia M Yeomans, j.yeomans1@physics.ox.ac.uk

 
Position closed

#5

Modeling the dynamics of slippery surfaces

A close interaction between modeling and experiment will be very important to fully understand and exploit the interaction of fluids with structured surfaces. LubISS aims to integrate modeling across all length scales to investigate properties that range from the detailed behaviour at the contact line to the way in which fluid films move across the designed substrates.

The DPhil (= Oxford PhD) student employed on this project will play a pivotal role by developing multiphase lattice Boltzmann simulations to model flow over the structured surfaces. We will need to determine how to include several coexisting phases, and how to model the viscoelastic properties of the lubricants. The codes will be used to consider the ability to repair surfaces by wicking, assess the dependence of lubricant stability on substrate geometry, and consider splashing and the consequent lubricant removal caused by droplet impact. The direction of the project will also depend on close interactions with other members of the LubISS team.

Lattice Boltzmann simulations of a drop bouncing on a cylinder

 

The position requires:

  • An interest in computational physics.
  • Strong analytic ability, as evidenced by eg an excellent first degree in physics, mathematics or a related subject.
  • A willingness to contribute fully to the scientific interactions of the network.

For further information please contact:
Prof. Julia M Yeomans, j.yeomans1@physics.ox.ac.uk

Position closed

#6

Easy processing of porous surfaces and approaches to replenish the drained lubricant

There are number of applications where high repellency of surfaces would be beneficial such as ice accretion and easy cleaning. Lubricant impregnated surfaces provide potential solution to create such properties. The aim of this PhD work is to study continuous/roll-to-roll fabrication of LUBricant Impregnated Slippery Surface multilayer structures or parts of them.

The successful candidate will define the requirements for the fabrication of the developed LUBricant Impregnated Slippery Surface -structures using continuous and/or roll-to-roll system. The candidate will focus on characterizing and testing of the performance of developed layers and structures and their functionalities. The candidate will research the performance of the lubricant impregnated surface-structures and the parameters influencing fabrication under pilot-scale conditions. Important part of the work is the assessment of performance determined by application such as packaging.


For further information please contact:
Prof. Petri Vuoristo, petri.vuoristo@tut.fi

Prof.Jurkka Kuusipalo, jurkka.kuusipalo@tut.fi

TUT Foundation – Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland

 
Please submit your application until April 10, 2017 via the Euraxess web site:

EURAXESS offer ID: 187461

#7

Investigating ice formation and adhesion of slippery surfaces prepared by thermal spraying

Surface engineering shows an increasing potential to provide a sustainable approach to icing problems. Currently, several passive anti-ice properties adoptable to coatings are known, but further research is required to proceed for practical applications. This is due to the fact that icing reduces safety, operational tempo, productivity and reliability of logistics, industry and infrastructure. This research work focuses on the development of icephobic coatings by using thermal spray technologies. Slippery structures produced by using thermal spray processing will be studied and optimized in order to develop functional slippery surfaces with a low ice adhesion. Functionalization of thermal spray coatings will be considered as potential method in order to produce icephobic surfaces, being the key research area in this PhD work.

The aim of this project is to study functionalization of thermal spray coatings by tailoring coating materials and coating structures for anti-icing applications. The successful candidate will develop slippery coatings and investigate the icing properties of potential thermal spray coatings. What is an optimal coating and surface structure for the low ice adhesion? What is the durability and functionality of these surfaces in cyclic icing conditions? How icing conditions affect the icephobicity? The candidate will focus on the development and preparation of feedstock materials, production of coatings and investigations of coating properties such as the ice adhesion and related surface properties. Ice formation and ice adhesion will be analyzed at TUT with the new design icing wind tunnel and centrifugal ice adhesion test facilities. The icing wind tunnel is capable of simulating ice accretion by both in-cloud mechanism (glaze and rime icing) and precipitation icing. Using these icing facilities, icing behavior in different icing conditions will be studied.

The position requires:

  • Background in materials science and material chemistry
  • Knowledge of polymer materials is beneficial
  • Knowledge of icing as a phenomenon is beneficial
  • Positive attitude to work in cold climate conditions and handy in tasks requiring precision work

For further information, please contact:

Prof. Petri Vuoristo, petri.vuoristo@tut.fi

Dr. Heli Koivuluoto, heli.koivuluoto@tut.fi

TUT Foundation – Tampere University of Technology (TUT), Tampere, Finland

 

Position closed

#8

Characterization of drop dynamics on slippery surface

To measure and understand the friction force generated as drops run along slippery surfaces.

To explore the way line friction impacts the region of contact line (formation of rims, etc.).


For further information please contact:
Prof. David Quéré, david.quéré@espci.fr

Ecole Superieure de Physique et de Chimie Industrielles, CNRS, Paris, France

 

Position closed

#9

Dewetting on slippery surfaces

To characterize the dewetting conditions and dynamics on slippery surfaces.

 


For further information please contact:
Prof. David Quéré, david.quéré@espci.fr

Ecole Superieure de Physique et de Chimie Industrielles, CNRS, Paris, France

 

Please submit your application until June 30, 2017 via the Euraxess web site:

EURAXESS offer ID: 211126